Forks in the Road: Tom Galloway's big Oswego footprints

Thomas Galloway

Tom Galloway

I first met Tom Galloway when he was the Oswego City Tax Assessor during the John O’C. Conway administration.  He served in the Lazarek, and Fitzgibbons administrations as well.  He also sold real estate on the side.

Tom and his wife Brigid were very active members of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, as were the Sullivans. My dad had a long working relationship with Tom’s uncle who worked alongside him as a Linotype operator at The Palladium-Times.

When the owners/developers of the Corner Stone Restaurant, located in the old stone mill along the river, just south of Utica Street, came upon hard times, Tom decided to branch out into the restaurant business, acquiring and renaming the “Cornerstone” as Bridie Manor, in honor of his recently, at the time, deceased wife, Brigid. It is still called “ Bridie Manor” today, although the Lombardo family operates it.

Brigid Galloway’s maiden name was Mahunik, of Mahunik’s bakery fame. Mahunik’s bakery, located at the corner of Hart and Ellen streets, was the pride and joy of the Polish community for many years.  Their polish breads and cinnamon buns were always popular, and the owner, who operated a large coal fired oven, used to invite the neighbors to bring their turkeys over for Thanksgiving, and he would cook them in his big oven for them.  The sweet smell of roast turkey permeated the entire neighborhood.  He would never accept any money for doing so, but the bottles of various booze neighbors dropped off in appreciation were enough to start their own liquor store had they desired.

Tom and Brigid had four children.  Their son, Tom, lives in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware and recently retired from Johns Hopkins University where he served as a medical technician.  Their son Dave died much too young, several years ago.  Their daughter Debbie Sampson lives in Scriba and works at one of the nuclear plants.  Tom has two grandchildren by his son Bill, who succeeded his dad in managing the family real estate and development company, Galloway Century 21 Real Estate, located along the river near Bridie Square.

  In addition to selling real estate, Tom Galloway went on to acquire several of the adjacent riverfront lots to Bridie Manor, which he ultimately developed as the West Linear Park was expanded southward toward the Varick Dam . That proved to be a wise investment, and his son Bill, who continues Galloway Century 21 Real Estate, maintains his headquarters there and leases several commercial spaces, as well as a few residential units.

Tom’s portfolio as a developer went beyond the river area, and expanded to both sides of the river, with an upscale housing development adjacent to Munn Street and the Hibernian property across from the Oswego Country Club. His other endeavor was the Woodridge high-end housing development just south of the Pontiac Nursing Home off state Route 481.

A paratrooper in the U.S. Army during the Korean War, Tom is the recipient of a Purple Heart for wounds sustained in combat.  He is very active in supporting the Veterans movement in the area, and was in 2016 was named Oswego County Veteran of the Year.

Tom Galloway is a man steadfast in purpose and determination, who achieved much and leaves a very proud legacy in the real estate and development world. He is an avid Facebook user and reader, and rarely misses a trick, even at the young age of 88.  His contributions to the Oswego community are legion, and it is an honor to know him, and to call him my friend.

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